Browse Journals and Peer-Reviewed Series

Church Advocate (Journals)

Introductory text for Church Advocate.

See the Aims and Scope for a complete coverage of the journal.

Conversations: A Graduate Student Journal of the Humanities, Social Sciences, and Theology (Journals)

ISSN 2332-4546

Conversations: A Graduate Student Journal of the Humanities, Social Sciences, and Theology is an online peer-reviewed academic journal which aims to be a forum for discussion of topics in the humanities, social sciences, and theology. It features the top papers from students in the Graduate School at Abilene Christian University.

Dialogue & Nexus (Journals)

Dialogue & Nexus explores the relationship between modern science and Christianity. This may be done by exploring the traditions, practices and doctrines of the church in light of new discovery; by bioethical discussions; or by considering a Christian response to the environment.

See About This Journal for more information.

Discernment: Theology and the Practice of Ministry (Journals)

ISSN 2475-9171

Discernment: Theology and the Practice of Ministry

Discernment is a journal of practical theology. In language accessible to the church, it presents peer-reviewed work by scholar-practitioners describing Christian ministry in a broad array of contexts, exemplified by: congregational life; a particular ministry within a congregation (children’s ministry or youth ministry, for example); mission contexts, whether single or multi-congregational; ministry in cross-cultural settings; or Christian ministry in an extra-congregational environment (for example: disaster relief, care for the poor, or care for children and families). See the Aims and Scope for more information about the journal's coverage.

Gospel Advance (Journals)

Introductory text for Gospel Advance.

See the Aims and Scope for a complete coverage of the journal.

Gospel Review (Journals)

Introductory text for Gospel Review.

See the Aims and Scope for a complete coverage of the journal.

Horizons Chrétiens (Stone-Campbell Archival Journals)

HORIZONS CHRETIENS : FRENCH TRANSLATION Horizons Chrétiens: 63 numéros de la revue chrétienne, publiée de 1975 à 1990. Yann Opsitch (évangéliste avec les Eglises du Christ en France, auteur et professeur) fonda la revue et fut le rédacteur en chef durant ses seize années de publication. Le but de la revue était de présenter aux non-croyants la vision chrétienne du monde ; il consistait aussi à présenter aux croyants l’idéal d’une restauration du christianisme néotestamentaire. Les doctrines du Nouveau Testament, ainsi que les sujets d’apologétique et d’histoire du christianisme prédominent. Ont contribué à la rédaction (certains auteurs ne sont pas affiliés aux Eglises du Christ) : Yann Opsitch, Sylvio Caddeo, John Clayton, Bernard Blandre, Jean-François Mayer, Arlin Hendrix, Judy Hendrix (†), Charles White, Don Daugherty (†), Seylvie Pessia, Richard Andrzejewski (†), Jean-Marie Frérot, Doyle Kee, Barbara Kee, Stéphane Bilak (†), Jacques Marchal (†), Jean Bertschi (†), Vitorio Vitalone, Basil Overton (†), Jerry Davidson, Robert Limb, Raymond Perrenoud, Fausto Salvoni (†), Richard Dries, S.F. Timmerman (†), Serge Rossi, Arnold Huyghbaert, Roland Mohsen, Hilton Terry (†), Teresa Peters (Vandergriff).

HORIZONS CHRETIENS : ENGLISH TRANSLATION Horizons Chrétiens (Christian Horizons): 63 issues of the French Christian magazine published from 1975 to 1990. Yann Opsitch (Christian evangelist with Churches of Christ, author and professor) founded the magazine and was also the editor during the sixteen years of publication. The purpose of the magazine was to present the Christian World View to non-believers. It was also to encourage believers to consider the plea for a restoration of New Testament Christianity. New Testament doctrine, Christian apologetics and Church history occupy a good portion of the magazine as well as religious news. Contributors to the articles include (some authors are not affiliated with Churches of Christ) Yann Opsitch, Sylvio Caddeo, John Clayton, Bernard Blandre, Jean-François Mayer, Arlin Hendrix, Judy Hendrix (†), Charles White, Don Daugherty (†), Seylvie Pessia, Richard Andrzejewski (†), Jean-Marie Frérot, Doyle Kee, Barbara Kee, Stéphane Bilak (†), Jacques Marchal (†), Jean Bertschi (†), Vitorio Vitalone, Basil Overton (†), Jerry Davidson, Robert Limb, Raymond Perrenoud, Fausto Salvoni (†), Richard Dries, S.F. Timmerman (†), Serge Rossi, Arnold Huyghbaert, Roland Mohsen, Hilton Terry (†), Teresa Peters (Vandergriff).

Journal of Cross-Cultural Family Studies (Journals)

The Journal of Cross-Cultural Family Studies publishes research centered on cross-cultural families for the expansion of understanding and practical application. It is published twice a year.

See the Aims and Scope for a more complete description of the journal.

Mission (Stone-Campbell Archival Journals)

Launched in 1967, Mission was a forum for theological reflection on issues such as race, gender, war and peace-making, the place of the church in urban society, the nature and implications of Restorationism and critical Biblical and historical scholarship.

Bob Turner, in his preface to this oral history project, describes Mission's character as "unique—sort of Sojourners meets Village Voice meets MAD Magazine. It was smart enough to provoke a theologian but accessible enough to put on your coffee table; classic enough to attract intellectuals in the 1960s but avante garde enough to get picked up by a college kid a generation later. It was unquestionably the literary counterculture of Church of Christ periodicals for two decades."

His oral history compiles reflections from some of the key persons involved in Mission from its founding to its closure in 1988: Dwain Evans, Don Haymes, Richard Hughes, Victor Hunter, Warren Lewis, and Thomas Olbricht.

Thomas Olbricht provides in this essay, New Journals for the Sixties: Restoration Quarterly and Mission an extended reflection and assessment of the impact of these journals. Drawing from his deep insider involvement in Mission and from Abe Malherbe's in Restoration Quarterly, Olbricht situates them within the journalistic, editorial, theological and historical contexts of the 1950s-1970s Churches of Christ.

Finally, Greg McKinzie conducted an interview-style session at the 2017 Christian Scholars' Conference, Lipscomb University, Nashville, TN, dedicated to recording the stories of Dwain Evans, Vic Hunter, and Richard Hughes in the production of Mission Journal. Participants reflected on the motivations, hardships, and successes of publishing thoughtful, courageous content during a tumultuous time for the country and for Churches of Christ. What were the personal costs? How did the journal evolve and why? What would they do differently if they had it to do over? And what is the legacy of Mission for today?

Open Arena (Journals)

In 1914 Austin McGary (1846-1928) entered his fourth decade of journalistic work among Churches of Christ when he launched The Open Arena.  From 1884-1902 he edited Firm Foundation; from 1903-1905 he published The Gospel Outlook; and in 1913 he served as Co-Editor of The Faithful Witness. All three were based in Texas. Subscriptions to The Open Arena, which consisted of eight pages, cost 25 cents for six months or 50 cents for a full year.  A. J. McCarty (of Killeen, Texas), C. H. Kennedy (of McKinney, Texas) and Joe McPherson (of Nashville, Tennessee) joined McGary as Associate Editors beginning in January 1915. Later that spring W. L. Stafford (of Altus, Oklahoma) joined became an Associate Editor and served through January 1916.  The bound volume we have in our collection lacks volume 1 numbers 9 and 10.  Further, readers will notice the numbering sequence advances into volume 2 (going through number 5 in July 1915) before reverting to volume 1 number 18 in August 1915.  The paper continued this sequence to the last issue, volume 1 number 28, in June 1916.  Indications suggest McGary could not secure enough subscribers to continue the paper past the summer of 1916.

Devoted to "the good fight of faith" the paper was characteristic of his journalistic stye: forthright and plain-spoken.  McGary is perhaps best known for leveraging his periodicals as a tool for advocating his views on a range of issues, from baptism to socialism, and from the nature of the church to the work of the Holy Spirit.  In the first issue McGary presents three reasons for starting a new paper even as he acknowledges the journalistic field among Churches of Christ has "too many papers:"

...although we already have too many papers, too many of these many we have are dodging certain points of "the faith once delivered unto the Saints" and flying the gospel track--the "narrow way" ordained of God.... I start this paper because there are parts of the field, upon which "plants" that were not "planted of the Heavenly Father," are growing rankly and overshadowing truth, that none of our papers giving attention to, in a "rooting-up" way, that this paper will give some "digging" attention to... ...When the Faithful Witness was discontinued...brethren and friends from many sections of Texas and Oklahoma...supplied me with the funds to introduce the paper and defray the expense of its upkeep for one year...*

Readers of The Open Arena will find much in its pages on these, and many other, topics.  Also of great value are the many items of news and notes about happenings among Churches of Christ.  Congregational and regional historians, students of intellectual and social history, and anyone interested in the history of Churches of Christ and Christian Churches will find the volumes of The Open Arena a welcome addition to their palette of source material.

 

Restoration Quarterly (Journals)

Restoration Quarterly is devoted to advancing knowledge and understanding of New Testament Christianity, its backgrounds, its history, and its implications for the present age. Articles in the journal do not necessarily represent the view of the editor, the editorial board, or the corporate board of Restoration Quarterly. The editor is responsible for the selection of material, but the responsibility for opinions expressed and accuracy of facts rests solely with the individual author.

This repository hosts selected Restoration Quarterly articles in downloadable PDF format. For the benefit of users who would like to browse the contents of RQ, we have included all issue covers even when full-text articles from that issue are unavailable. All Restoration Quarterly articles are available in full text in the ATLA Religion Database, available through most university and theological libraries or through your local library’s inter-library loan service.

South China Chimes (Journals)

Though only four pages (one sheet of paper folded once) South China Chimes is rich in information about the work of missionaries E. L. Broaddus and Ethel Mattley.  Given the circumstances of the war, there are fascinating, chilling, and poignant comments such as this note from the February-March 1938 issue: We are continually being asked why we do not leave Hongkong and return to America until the trouble is over.  I think you would feel very different about it if you could realize the great need of proper teaching at such a time as this.  We have greater opportunities than ever to preach the gospel to the unsaved and many of them have more time to think on these things than they ever have or perhaps ever will have. To say the least the Seed must be sown and the Lord will look after the development. The following month Broaddus wrote this about Ethel Mattley:After months of waiting for conditions to improve Miss Mattley decided to return to Kwongsi and go ahead with the work. She was not at all well here due to asthma and the higher altitude should relieve that and she will be able to carry on with the work among the women and children in spite of the war spirit and training of soldiers. The native workers and Christians need encouragement in such times as these and there may be an opportunity to even reach some with the gospel. Readers of these few issues of this scarce periodical will find several more similar comments, plus items of news and notes about happenings among Churches of Christ in China.  Historians of missions and missiology, students of intellectual and social history, and anyone interested in the history of Churches of Christ will find these issues of South China Chimes a welcome addition to their palette of source material.

The Shepherd's Voice (Journals)

In September 1897 the Churches of Christ mission to Japan was just a few years old. W. K. Azbill and John Moody McCaleb, joined by Eugenese Snodgrass, arrived in 1892. Snodgrass had been in Japan since 1888 under the auspices of the Foreign Christian Missionary Society. The McCaleb mission, however, was supported only by local Churches of Christ and individuals in the United States apart from missionary societies or missions boards. After a separation from Azbill, Snodgrass and McCaleb, along with Carme Hostetter, whose work is described in the first issue here, pioneered the independent missionary presence of the Stone-Campbell movement in Japan. The Shepherd’s Voice is one of the earliest, if not the earliest extant, periodicals to document and raise awareness and support for this independent missionary work. As such it contains a trove of information about the mission activities, offering primary source material unavailable elsewhere. For example, the first issue contains a nice portrait of Hostetter and a photograph of her school along with a series of “inductive Bible lessons’ that reveal the kind of teaching the mission conducted. “The Shepherd’s Voice, writes the Editor, “besides recording current Eastern religious, literary, and social news, is the only magazine in Japan devoted especially to studying and teaching the Bible.”* Subscribers in Japan paid 50 sen per year; subscribers outside Japan paid one dollar. While subscriptions were available to readers in the United States, presumably especially the Americans who supported the mission, the paper is primarily directed to a Japanese readership. Significant portions of the articles in the 1898 issues are in Japanese and the 1898 issues reproduce portions of a debate Snodgrass held with a Japanese man. Readers of these few issues of this scarce periodical will find several more similar comments, plus items of news and notes about happenings among Churches of Christ in Japan. Historians of missions and missiology, students of intellectual and social history, and anyone interested in the history of Churches of Christ will find these issues of The Shepherd’s Voice a welcome addition to their palette of source material. We thank The Burke Library at Union Theological Seminary, Columbia University in the City of New York for partnering with us to make these rare issues available online. Burke holds the original issues.